Debt Consolidation USA Shares Most Common Barriers To Household Formation

by Shelton on February 23rd, 2015

filed under Debt Consolidation

Debt Consolidation USA recently shared in an article how American consumers are taking a step back when thinking about household formation. The article aims to help consumers by looking at and understanding some of the most common hindrances to proceeding with household formation.

Miami, FL (PRWEB) February 11, 2015

Debt Consolidation USA recently shared in an article published recently how American consumers are taking a step back when thinking about household formation. The article titled “4 Biggest Financial Hindrance To Household Formation” aims to help consumers by looking at and understanding some of the most common hindrances to proceeding with household formation.

The article starts off by pointing out that household formation can mean different things to different people. For one, it can be about taking up a mortgage loan to have a house of their own. It can also mean for some couples that household formation is all about getting married and making a family of their own. And for some married couples, it can mean having children or adding more children into the family.

One thing is for sure whatever people’s definition is of household formation, it costs money and can have a significant effect on their finances. With this, it is imperative that consumers understand some of the most common financial roadblocks they might face when they try to push through with household formation.

The article explains that on the top of the list is that some people just has too much debt. It fills up their budget quickly that they do not have enough elbow room to move around and consider adding more items to the budget like a mortgage payment or saving for a wedding or for putting aside for another child.

Another reason is that a lot of American consumers especially the younger generation are saddled with student loan debt. This prevents them from pursuing other financial dreams because they feel they have to pay-off their school loans first before they even consider other financial tools.

Another thing that prevents consumers in pursuing household formation is low income usually from underemployment. This limits their options with their current situation and the thought of getting a house adding a big mortgage payment is not in the near future. To read the full article, click this link: http://www.debtconsolidationusa.com/personal-finance/4-biggest-financial-hindrance-household-formation.html

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/financial_hindrance/to_household_formation/prweb12506913.htm

Start-up producer designs aquaponic system

by Shelton on February 23rd, 2015

filed under Personal Funding

POCATELLO, Idaho #x2014; Scott Richardson quit studying physics, but he#x2019;s found ample opportunity to be on the cutting edge of science in small-scale agricultural production.

In December of 2013, the 31-year-old Pocatello man built a #x201c;pilot#x201d; aquaponic greenhouse to test his theories about a sustainable production system capable of yielding a large amount of food from a tiny space.

#x201c;My main goal is to advance technology,#x201d; Richardson said. #x201c;I was looking at my life saying, #x2018;I need to do what I love.#x2019;#x201d;

The 15-by-40-foot greenhouse he constructed from recycled lumber, partially sunk into an earthen berm for winter insulation and summer cooling, includes a tank of tilapia to provide the nutrient source. Waste water from the fish is dripped into planters, filled with crushed coconut shells and expanded clay to absorb the moisture for the plants to use. Naturally occurring bacteria convert ammonia in the excrement into a usable form for plants. Produce production provides a natural filter to clean the waste water before it#x2019;s returned to the fish tank. The tilapia tank is heated, which also provides a sufficient winter heat source for the greenhouse. Richardson stacks the planters vertically to maximize space.

#x201c;We were doing 500 heads of lettuce on 50 square feet,#x201d; Richardson said.

Richardson tested his design virtually with 3-D modeling software.

He built the first greenhouse in Pocatello with $15,000 in personal funding. He#x2019;s taken the structure apart and plans to rebuild a 15-by-80-foot version this spring in nearby Arbon Valley, Idaho, raising additional funding through his Sustainable Pocatello online fundraising campaign on the crowd-funding website indiegogo.com. He#x2019;ll have 20 acres available at his new site, enabling him to raise some outdoor produce during warmer months. He plans to offer a community supported agriculture service and sell to the local food cooperative, area restaurants and at the local farmers#x2019; market. He said his broader goal, however, is to raise awareness about a method of agriculture that holds promise for urban areas with little open land, including the tops of city buildings.

#x201c;We#x2019;re excited to see their first crop. It#x2019;s cool technology,#x201d; said Evan Roberts, a Pocatello Co-op board member.

Emily Fisher, owner of Pocatello#x2019;s Efresh sandwich shop, has committed to buy his herbs to support local food production.

Richardson has visited hydroponic produce farmer Erik Cutter in Irvine, Calif., for ideas on how to set up his system, and market his food.

Cutter provided him with polypropylene planters he developed for his own vertically stacked configuration.

In Orange County, Cutter said traditional farm land is hard to come by. He said his system maximizes land, water and fertilizer while yielding quality produce, which he sells to high-end restaurants.

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